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Testing out Firefox 4 on Ubuntu 10.10...

Posted by Archeo-peteriX 
November 01, 2010 03:16PM
I'm trying to run the FF4 beta browser. It works great on most forums but on a couple I can't post. The FF3.6 works fine though.
rkj
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Archeo-peteriX
I'm trying to run the FF4 beta browser. It works great on most forums but on a couple I can't post. The FF3.6 works fine though.

Finally kicked the windows habit Peter? (you're running a PC, right?) I think I'll always be a windows XP slave. I actually like it eye rolling smiley though
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rkj
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Archeo-peteriX
I'm trying to run the FF4 beta browser. It works great on most forums but on a couple I can't post. The FF3.6 works fine though.

Finally kicked the windows habit Peter? (you're running a PC, right?) I think I'll always be a windows XP slave. I actually like it eye rolling smiley though

Yeh, I actually kicked it a little over a year ago. And yes, I'm still running a PC...Linux makes it run like an E30 through the twisties winking smiley

XP is alright if you don't mind having to be constantly on top of anti-virus, anti-spyware and anti-adware programs and updates winking smiley

It really pains me when I go back to XP to look for something; just can't wait to get outta there and back to Ubuntu smiling smiley

Best of all is, Linux is FREE; all it's open source applications are FREE, updates and upgrades are FREE and support is FREE.
I haven't come across a single application I would use today that I couldn't find for Linux. Many are completely compatible with their MS counterparts and any Windows apps that are specific with no 100% alternatives; can be run in Linux with a Windows Emulator.

It simple has the best of everything smileys with beer
What do you do about device drivers?

alan
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alanrw
What do you do about device drivers?

alan

Nothing; they are automatically loaded. There are probably more drivers available than MS supports.

I haven't come across anything that wasn't available and up to date.

The community support for Linux is vastly superior to the myopic MS. There are tens of thousands of people working on Linux all over the world!
I'm with Peter on this one. I've been running Linux as my primary OS since its infancy in 1995. Most device drivers are readily available, with few exceptions. I happen to have a Canon multifunction printer at home, which is one of the exceptions. Canon has been awful about releasing Linux drivers, but the support community has come through with drivers that work.

There are very few things that I need Windows for. One of them is the OBDC software on my laptop, which requires Windows. Another is the rFactor driving simulator (that I spend way too much time on smiling smiley).

Even my wife, who is not even close to a techno-geek like I am, saw my Linux box and asked me to install it on her laptop. So gave her a dual-boot setup like I have, and she never uses Windows any more. She just likes the feel of Linux better. (We're using Fedora, but it's not that much different from Ubuntu.)

__________
Dave
'91 325iX
rkj
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Dave_G
I'm with Peter on this one. I've been running Linux as my primary OS since its infancy in 1995. Most device drivers are readily available, with few exceptions. I happen to have a Canon multifunction printer at home, which is one of the exceptions. Canon has been awful about releasing Linux drivers, but the support community has come through with drivers that work.

There are very few things that I need Windows for. One of them is the OBDC software on my laptop, which requires Windows. Another is the rFactor driving simulator (that I spend way too much time on smiling smiley).

Even my wife, who is not even close to a techno-geek like I am, saw my Linux box and asked me to install it on her laptop. So gave her a dual-boot setup like I have, and she never uses Windows any more. She just likes the feel of Linux better. (We're using Fedora, but it's not that much different from Ubuntu.)

Interesting, is there any way to try it out before you commit to it. I've been running XP so long I think I like it but what would be better about Linux, is it that different (still a PC, right?) or does Linux make the computer less likely to screw up? I do video and pictures on the computer if that makes any difference.

Cheers and thanks, Rick
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rkj
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Dave_G
I'm with Peter on this one. I've been running Linux as my primary OS since its infancy in 1995. Most device drivers are readily available, with few exceptions. I happen to have a Canon multifunction printer at home, which is one of the exceptions. Canon has been awful about releasing Linux drivers, but the support community has come through with drivers that work.

There are very few things that I need Windows for. One of them is the OBDC software on my laptop, which requires Windows. Another is the rFactor driving simulator (that I spend way too much time on smiling smiley).

Even my wife, who is not even close to a techno-geek like I am, saw my Linux box and asked me to install it on her laptop. So gave her a dual-boot setup like I have, and she never uses Windows any more. She just likes the feel of Linux better. (We're using Fedora, but it's not that much different from Ubuntu.)

Interesting, is there any way to try it out before you commit to it. I've been running XP so long I think I like it but what would be better about Linux, is it that different (still a PC, right?) or does Linux make the computer less likely to screw up? I do video and pictures on the computer if that makes any difference.

Cheers and thanks, Rick

Yes, you can try out most flavours of Linux. What you do is download an image file (*.iso) then you burn it to a CD/DVD. Once that's done, you've created a Live CD and you just put the CD/DVD in the computer and start it up. The computer will load what it needs into RAM and then run.
This method doesn't install to the computer so you don't have to worry about screwing anything up.

Most Linux versions have all the programs you need that are equivalent or better than those for Windows.

What's different about Linux is that it is light years faster than Windows; on any platform; it's secure so you don't have to run a bunch of anti-vurus, anti spyware or anti-adware programs that all suck resources. It loads faster, it runs browsers faster and it's all FREE!
rkj
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Archeo-peteriX
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rkj
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Dave_G
I'm with Peter on this one. I've been running Linux as my primary OS since its infancy in 1995. Most device drivers are readily available, with few exceptions. I happen to have a Canon multifunction printer at home, which is one of the exceptions. Canon has been awful about releasing Linux drivers, but the support community has come through with drivers that work.

There are very few things that I need Windows for. One of them is the OBDC software on my laptop, which requires Windows. Another is the rFactor driving simulator (that I spend way too much time on smiling smiley).

Even my wife, who is not even close to a techno-geek like I am, saw my Linux box and asked me to install it on her laptop. So gave her a dual-boot setup like I have, and she never uses Windows any more. She just likes the feel of Linux better. (We're using Fedora, but it's not that much different from Ubuntu.)

Interesting, is there any way to try it out before you commit to it. I've been running XP so long I think I like it but what would be better about Linux, is it that different (still a PC, right?) or does Linux make the computer less likely to screw up? I do video and pictures on the computer if that makes any difference.

Cheers and thanks, Rick

Yes, you can try out most flavours of Linux. What you do is download an image file (*.iso) then you burn it to a CD/DVD. Once that's done, you've created a Live CD and you just put the CD/DVD in the computer and start it up. The computer will load what it needs into RAM and then run.
This method doesn't install to the computer so you don't have to worry about screwing anything up.

Most Linux versions have all the programs you need that are equivalent or better than those for Windows.

What's different about Linux is that it is light years faster than Windows; on any platform; it's secure so you don't have to run a bunch of anti-vurus, anti spyware or anti-adware programs that all suck resources. It loads faster, it runs browsers faster and it's all FREE!

I'll have to try that Peter, I just hooked up my new dvd/cd external unit I got from tigerdirect, my disc drive packed up in my acer. I set up the nero software today for making dvd's so I'll give her a try next week- can I call you if I get in trouble?

Like to call you anyway, might be fun smileys with beer I'll write you an email.....
rkj
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rkj
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Archeo-peteriX
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rkj
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Dave_G
I'm with Peter on this one. I've been running Linux as my primary OS since its infancy in 1995. Most device drivers are readily available, with few exceptions. I happen to have a Canon multifunction printer at home, which is one of the exceptions. Canon has been awful about releasing Linux drivers, but the support community has come through with drivers that work.

There are very few things that I need Windows for. One of them is the OBDC software on my laptop, which requires Windows. Another is the rFactor driving simulator (that I spend way too much time on smiling smiley).

Even my wife, who is not even close to a techno-geek like I am, saw my Linux box and asked me to install it on her laptop. So gave her a dual-boot setup like I have, and she never uses Windows any more. She just likes the feel of Linux better. (We're using Fedora, but it's not that much different from Ubuntu.)

Interesting, is there any way to try it out before you commit to it. I've been running XP so long I think I like it but what would be better about Linux, is it that different (still a PC, right?) or does Linux make the computer less likely to screw up? I do video and pictures on the computer if that makes any difference.

Cheers and thanks, Rick

Yes, you can try out most flavours of Linux. What you do is download an image file (*.iso) then you burn it to a CD/DVD. Once that's done, you've created a Live CD and you just put the CD/DVD in the computer and start it up. The computer will load what it needs into RAM and then run.
This method doesn't install to the computer so you don't have to worry about screwing anything up.

Most Linux versions have all the programs you need that are equivalent or better than those for Windows.

What's different about Linux is that it is light years faster than Windows; on any platform; it's secure so you don't have to run a bunch of anti-vurus, anti spyware or anti-adware programs that all suck resources. It loads faster, it runs browsers faster and it's all FREE!

I went on the Linux site last night, interesting. I can load the system on to a flash drive and use it that way, right?

Do you have to have a windows OP to run Linux or can it stand alone?

When I run Linux from my flash drive what happens to all my windows files and programs; can I get to them or do I have to transfer everything???
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rkj
...

I went on the Linux site last night, interesting. I can load the system on to a flash drive and use it that way, right?

Do you have to have a windows OP to run Linux or can it stand alone?

When I run Linux from my flash drive what happens to all my windows files and programs; can I get to them or do I have to transfer everything???

You can load the system onto a USB stick and it will work if your computer can boot from the USB stick...I don't remember how old your machine is.

The Linux you install on the USB stick is all that's needed to run the computer; it doesn't use the hard drive or Windows at all thumbs up

Once you have Linux running from the USB Stick you should be able to see everything that is on the hard drive and even have access to your files and pics.

Remind me again what computer you have and how much RAM...

BTW...you never sent me an e-mail.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 11/08/2010 02:01PM by Archeo-peteriX.
rkj
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Archeo-peteriX
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rkj
...

I went on the Linux site last night, interesting. I can load the system on to a flash drive and use it that way, right?

Do you have to have a windows OP to run Linux or can it stand alone?

When I run Linux from my flash drive what happens to all my windows files and programs; can I get to them or do I have to transfer everything???

You can load the system onto a USB stick and it will work if your computer can boot from the USB stick...I don't remember how old your machine is.

The Linux you install on the USB stick is all that's needed to run the computer; it doesn't use the hard drive or Windows at all thumbs up

Once you have Linux running from the USB Stick you should be able to see everything that is on the hard drive and even have access to your files and pics.

Remind me again what computer you have and how much RAM...

BTW...you never sent me an e-mail.

Hey Peter, Thanks.

Right now I'm up to my ears in storm windows, had to fix some rotted ones this year before I lost them completely! Winter, that will get your priorities in order....

Here's what I have on this computer in the shop/office. It's an Acer aspire 5000, XP home edition, service pack 3, 1.80 GHz, 448mb of ram, AMD Turion 64 mobile.

Is that enough info? Seems like I could have more ram ....
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rkj
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Archeo-peteriX
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rkj
...

I went on the Linux site last night, interesting. I can load the system on to a flash drive and use it that way, right?

Do you have to have a windows OP to run Linux or can it stand alone?

When I run Linux from my flash drive what happens to all my windows files and programs; can I get to them or do I have to transfer everything???

You can load the system onto a USB stick and it will work if your computer can boot from the USB stick...I don't remember how old your machine is.

The Linux you install on the USB stick is all that's needed to run the computer; it doesn't use the hard drive or Windows at all thumbs up

Once you have Linux running from the USB Stick you should be able to see everything that is on the hard drive and even have access to your files and pics.

Remind me again what computer you have and how much RAM...

BTW...you never sent me an e-mail.

Hey Peter, Thanks.

Right now I'm up to my ears in storm windows, had to fix some rotted ones this year before I lost them completely! Winter, that will get your priorities in order....

Here's what I have on this computer in the shop/office. It's an Acer aspire 5000, XP home edition, service pack 3, 1.80 GHz, 448mb of ram, AMD Turion 64 mobile.

Is that enough info? Seems like I could have more ram ....

Are you running wireless? If so that will be a major pain to get running with the Internet sad smiley

Otherwise, I would recommend Puppy Linux as it is designed specifically for minimal resources like your computer has.
I am surprised your machine even works with XP and only 448MB of RAM(sounds about right) as it is a memory hog.
rkj
Are you running wireless? If so that will be a major pain to get running with the Internet sad smiley

Otherwise, I would recommend Puppy Linux as it is designed specifically for minimal resources like your computer has.
I am surprised your machine even works with XP and only 448MB of RAM(sounds about right) as it is a memory hog.[/quote]

Yes, I'm wireless in the shop and the house too but I hardwired the Acer because I thought it better and would run faster.

Yes, I know the ram is anemic but it does work, although slowly, but the computer will except up to two gigs of ram. Maybe some day but baby needs a new pair of bars (and they're 250 bucks) and they are custom.... so computer parts are going to have to wait.
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rkj
Are you running wireless? If so that will be a major pain to get running with the Internet sad smiley

Otherwise, I would recommend Puppy Linux as it is designed specifically for minimal resources like your computer has.
I am surprised your machine even works with XP and only 448MB of RAM(sounds about right) as it is a memory hog.

Yes, I'm wireless in the shop and the house too but I hardwired the Acer because I thought it better and would run faster.

Yes, I know the ram is anemic but it does work, although slowly, but the computer will except up to two gigs of ram. Maybe some day but baby needs a new pair of bars (and they're 250 bucks) and they are custom.... so computer parts are going to have to wait.[/quote]

Well, since the Acer is hard wired, that eliminates the biggest hold back.
The 448MB of RAM is not a problem for a distribution like Puppy Linux; it should boot and run circles around anything else you've got. You'll need a 1GB USB stick or larger but those are cheap enough these days.

Before you do anything though, you need to establish that the Acer can boot from a USB device. You can check this by going into the BIOS before XP starts up. When the computer is starting there should be a text message that says 'setup' 'boot options' or similar with a keystroke to use. Look for ESC or F1 or DELETE or similar. Once in the BIOS, you want to look under Boot Options or perhaps Standard. Just try the various menus until you find the one that has all the boot options. If it has one to 'enable' Boot from USB; that's the one you want. If not then the exercise is pointless.
rkj
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Archeo-peteriX
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rkj
Are you running wireless? If so that will be a major pain to get running with the Internet sad smiley

Otherwise, I would recommend Puppy Linux as it is designed specifically for minimal resources like your computer has.
I am surprised your machine even works with XP and only 448MB of RAM(sounds about right) as it is a memory hog.

Yes, I'm wireless in the shop and the house too but I hardwired the Acer because I thought it better and would run faster.

Yes, I know the ram is anemic but it does work, although slowly, but the computer will except up to two gigs of ram. Maybe some day but baby needs a new pair of bars (and they're 250 bucks) and they are custom.... so computer parts are going to have to wait.

Well, since the Acer is hard wired, that eliminates the biggest hold back.
The 448MB of RAM is not a problem for a distribution like Puppy Linux; it should boot and run circles around anything else you've got. You'll need a 1GB USB stick or larger but those are cheap enough these days.

Before you do anything though, you need to establish that the Acer can boot from a USB device. You can check this by going into the BIOS before XP starts up. When the computer is starting there should be a text message that says 'setup' 'boot options' or similar with a keystroke to use. Look for ESC or F1 or DELETE or similar. Once in the BIOS, you want to look under Boot Options or perhaps Standard. Just try the various menus until you find the one that has all the boot options. If it has one to 'enable' Boot from USB; that's the one you want. If not then the exercise is pointless.[/quote]

I really need more ram in the acer, it's painfully slow at times these days and I've done away with the avg which was making it stall completely occasionally. If I order ram for it can I just install it without doing anything else; is it a self loader (software like wise). One just installs it in the computer under it's hatch cover, right? No metal tools, yes?

I'll check on prices tomorrow. I think I should go for the full two gigs because I'm editing video these days, actually more and more. I have fallen in love with moving pictures thumbs up

I have to go into bios hey, I think I'll just bone up on downloading on to cd, I have the software/hardware now, it's just more good training!

Peter, if get the ram up to snuff are all the rest of my specs okay?

Thanks, Rick
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rkj
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Archeo-peteriX
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rkj
Are you running wireless? If so that will be a major pain to get running with the Internet sad smiley

Otherwise, I would recommend Puppy Linux as it is designed specifically for minimal resources like your computer has.
I am surprised your machine even works with XP and only 448MB of RAM(sounds about right) as it is a memory hog.

Yes, I'm wireless in the shop and the house too but I hardwired the Acer because I thought it better and would run faster.

Yes, I know the ram is anemic but it does work, although slowly, but the computer will except up to two gigs of ram. Maybe some day but baby needs a new pair of bars (and they're 250 bucks) and they are custom.... so computer parts are going to have to wait.

Well, since the Acer is hard wired, that eliminates the biggest hold back.
The 448MB of RAM is not a problem for a distribution like Puppy Linux; it should boot and run circles around anything else you've got. You'll need a 1GB USB stick or larger but those are cheap enough these days.

Before you do anything though, you need to establish that the Acer can boot from a USB device. You can check this by going into the BIOS before XP starts up. When the computer is starting there should be a text message that says 'setup' 'boot options' or similar with a keystroke to use. Look for ESC or F1 or DELETE or similar. Once in the BIOS, you want to look under Boot Options or perhaps Standard. Just try the various menus until you find the one that has all the boot options. If it has one to 'enable' Boot from USB; that's the one you want. If not then the exercise is pointless.

I really need more ram in the acer, it's painfully slow at times these days and I've done away with the avg which was making it stall completely occasionally. If I order ram for it can I just install it without doing anything else; is it a self loader (software like wise). One just installs it in the computer under it's hatch cover, right? No metal tools, yes?

I'll check on prices tomorrow. I think I should go for the full two gigs because I'm editing video these days, actually more and more. I have fallen in love with moving pictures thumbs up

I have to go into bios hey, I think I'll just bone up on downloading on to cd, I have the software/hardware now, it's just more good training!

Peter, if get the ram up to snuff are all the rest of my specs okay?

Thanks, Rick[/quote]

I'm not familiar with your specific computer but generally, you will simply pull the old memory out and replace it with the new one. If it is the correct kind of memory, the computer should fire right up and run like a banshee smiling smiley The rest of your machine sounds more than adequate for even a full distribution of Linux like Ubuntu or Fedora.

Booting from a CD is much easier and less trouble. Once you decide to keep using Linux, then you can install it on your hard drive. Then you can choose to run XP or Linux each time you turn the computer on.
rkj
Peter sez....I'm not familiar with your specific computer but generally, you will simply pull the old memory out and replace it with the new one. If it is the correct kind of memory, the computer should fire right up and run like a banshee smiling smiley The rest of your machine sounds more than adequate for even a full distribution of Linux like Ubuntu or Fedora.

Booting from a CD is much easier and less trouble. Once you decide to keep using Linux, then you can install it on your hard drive. Then you can choose to run XP or Linux each time you turn the computer on.

Rick sez.... I ordered the ram today, 134.00 with the software cd for 2 gigs. The salesman said it should act like an sd card; push it in and then out. Pretty simple. I couldn't use what I have in the machine so that's that. Hopefully I'll be scootin around next week smileys with beer
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rkj
Peter sez....I'm not familiar with your specific computer but generally, you will simply pull the old memory out and replace it with the new one. If it is the correct kind of memory, the computer should fire right up and run like a banshee smiling smiley The rest of your machine sounds more than adequate for even a full distribution of Linux like Ubuntu or Fedora.

Booting from a CD is much easier and less trouble. Once you decide to keep using Linux, then you can install it on your hard drive. Then you can choose to run XP or Linux each time you turn the computer on.

Rick sez.... I ordered the ram today, 134.00 with the software cd for 2 gigs. The salesman said it should act like an sd card; push it in and then out. Pretty simple. I couldn't use what I have in the machine so that's that. Hopefully I'll be scootin around next week smileys with beer

Having 2GB of RAM will make it seem like your computer has a turbo charger smileys with beer

So will this RAM stick double as handle bars? grinning smiley



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 11/09/2010 02:42PM by Archeo-peteriX.
rkj
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Archeo-peteriX
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rkj
Peter sez....I'm not familiar with your specific computer but generally, you will simply pull the old memory out and replace it with the new one. If it is the correct kind of memory, the computer should fire right up and run like a banshee smiling smiley The rest of your machine sounds more than adequate for even a full distribution of Linux like Ubuntu or Fedora.

Booting from a CD is much easier and less trouble. Once you decide to keep using Linux, then you can install it on your hard drive. Then you can choose to run XP or Linux each time you turn the computer on.

Rick sez.... I ordered the ram today, 134.00 with the software cd for 2 gigs. The salesman said it should act like an sd card; push it in and then out. Pretty simple. I couldn't use what I have in the machine so that's that. Hopefully I'll be scootin around next week smileys with beer

Having 2GB of RAM will make it seem like your computer has a turbo charger smileys with beer

So will this RAM stick double as handle bars? grinning smiley

If only, B) the bars will have to wait, the memory was needed when I got this machine 5-6 years ago! and I'm starting to really use this computer.

Does all memory fit in like an sd card?
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rkj
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Archeo-peteriX
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rkj
Peter sez....I'm not familiar with your specific computer but generally, you will simply pull the old memory out and replace it with the new one. If it is the correct kind of memory, the computer should fire right up and run like a banshee smiling smiley The rest of your machine sounds more than adequate for even a full distribution of Linux like Ubuntu or Fedora.

Booting from a CD is much easier and less trouble. Once you decide to keep using Linux, then you can install it on your hard drive. Then you can choose to run XP or Linux each time you turn the computer on.

Rick sez.... I ordered the ram today, 134.00 with the software cd for 2 gigs. The salesman said it should act like an sd card; push it in and then out. Pretty simple. I couldn't use what I have in the machine so that's that. Hopefully I'll be scootin around next week smileys with beer

Having 2GB of RAM will make it seem like your computer has a turbo charger smileys with beer

So will this RAM stick double as handle bars? grinning smiley

If only, B) the bars will have to wait, the memory was needed when I got this machine 5-6 years ago! and I'm starting to really use this computer.

Does all memory fit in like an sd card?

No, there are several memory configurations, depending on the type of computer and the age of it. Even if two different pieces of memory physically fit, they may not work if they are of different technologies or clock speeds.
rkj
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Archeo-peteriX
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rkj
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Archeo-peteriX
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rkj
Peter sez....I'm not familiar with your specific computer but generally, you will simply pull the old memory out and replace it with the new one. If it is the correct kind of memory, the computer should fire right up and run like a banshee smiling smiley The rest of your machine sounds more than adequate for even a full distribution of Linux like Ubuntu or Fedora.

Booting from a CD is much easier and less trouble. Once you decide to keep using Linux, then you can install it on your hard drive. Then you can choose to run XP or Linux each time you turn the computer on.

Rick sez.... I ordered the ram today, 134.00 with the software cd for 2 gigs. The salesman said it should act like an sd card; push it in and then out. Pretty simple. I couldn't use what I have in the machine so that's that. Hopefully I'll be scootin around next week smileys with beer

Having 2GB of RAM will make it seem like your computer has a turbo charger smileys with beer

So will this RAM stick double as handle bars? grinning smiley

If only, B) the bars will have to wait, the memory was needed when I got this machine 5-6 years ago! and I'm starting to really use this computer.

Does all memory fit in like an sd card?

No, there are several memory configurations, depending on the type of computer and the age of it. Even if two different pieces of memory physically fit, they may not work if they are of different technologies or clock speeds.

Right, I almost knew that. Thanks Peter smileys with beer
rkj
So, with the new memory, the shop acer runs like the house IBM (that has the same processor speed and 2 gigs of ram) and what a pleasure. It did not, however, just snap in like an sd card; it took me awhile to figure out the two clips (they looked sooo breakable) that lock the boards in to place, luckily I manged to figure it out without breaking anything. Once I got them to move (they're in there tight) and actually got the top one out the rest was easy, but delicate. Working on my computer is cool though, just another mind set, and having it zip along like the IBM is really neat... With less than a 1/2 gig of ram this was one slow box on XP.

Thanks Peter for pointing that out (again). Now, back to the storm windows grinning smiley next week, when the rain hits town I'll be loading the Linux on to a cd thumbs up for a try out.

Rick
Rick, it is just like cars except you don't get any grease under your fingernails.

smiling smiley

alan
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alanrw
Rick, it is just like cars except you don't get any grease under your fingernails.

smiling smiley

alan

Actually it's better...if you break down, you're already at home grinning smiley
rkj
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Archeo-peteriX
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alanrw
Rick, it is just like cars except you don't get any grease under your fingernails.

smiling smiley

alan

Actually it's better...if you break down, you're already at home grinning smiley

Hey Alan, looking at the insides of this thing is a bit intimidating though, especially for a novice, and breaking down at home is fine, I have back up.

The computer is so much faster, even turning on and off thumbs up should've done this a long time ago!

Thanks Guys
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