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Classic Boat Fair

Posted by rkj 
rkj
July 18, 2010 12:41PM
Janet and I belong to a small Boat club here on the Island, it's a great bunch of people and gaining in numbers every year. We hold events from time to time and yesterday there was a gathering of small boats members have built or come by. It was a great day thumbs up with people I have so much in common with and share a love of small boats (big ones too but most of us only have small, manageable types).

On the grounds is a long standing restoration of a Gil Smith cat boat (only one large main sail; cat boat= one sail). We have built a house for it and it sits ready for more work as funds provide, originally a work boat around the Island it is one of the most beautiful, to my eye, boats ever built. One look transports me to another century when things were simple, clean and to the point. What do you think Peter?...









Senad is 25 1/2 feet long with an 8.8 foot beam (width). She is one of three built in the late 1800's.

Cheers, Rick



perseverance furthers
July 18, 2010 02:12PM
Where does the mast get stepped on that boat?
Surely it can't be up front as in a cat boat; the hull length to width ratio is wrong. Is this perhaps a sand bagger?
rkj
July 18, 2010 05:23PM
Quote
Archeo-peteriX
Where does the mast get stepped on that boat?
Surely it can't be up front as in a cat boat; the hull length to width ratio is wrong. Is this perhaps a sand bagger?

The mast gets stepped way up front, if you look closely you'll see a red mooring ball stuck in the deck next to the bow.

Yeah, you'd think it was all portioned wrong but you'd be the one wrong on that one; cat boats were often stepped "way" up front. I'll do some research later on Gill's boats. There's one that sails with my friends Beetle cats on the pond every year, it's a cat boat too, similar to Senad, mast way up front.

It's a strange beast Cat boats, they don't point to well but are forgiving and easy to sail, a gentleman's rig B)
July 18, 2010 07:20PM
Quote
rkj
Quote
Archeo-peteriX
Where does the mast get stepped on that boat?
Surely it can't be up front as in a cat boat; the hull length to width ratio is wrong. Is this perhaps a sand bagger?

The mast gets stepped way up front, if you look closely you'll see a red mooring ball stuck in the deck next to the bow.

Yeah, you'd think it was all portioned wrong but you'd be the one wrong on that one; cat boats were often stepped "way" up front. I'll do some research later on Gill's boats. There's one that sails with my friends Beetle cats on the pond every year, it's a cat boat too, similar to Senad, mast way up front.

It's a strange beast Cat boats, they don't point to well but are forgiving and easy to sail, a gentleman's rig B)

The reason I questioned it is because a traditional cat boat is roughly L by W(1/2 L) or the width is half the length. That quality is what makes the cat boat so stable and able to handle weather that scares the livin bejeezus out of most other craft.

Another big advantage of the cat-rig is that a single sailor can manage the boat in just about any weather thumbs up

If I ever build a cruising boat, or even a picnic sailor; it will be a cat for sure B)
rkj
July 18, 2010 07:50PM
Quote
Archeo-peteriX
Quote
rkj
Quote
Archeo-peteriX
Where does the mast get stepped on that boat?
Surely it can't be up front as in a cat boat; the hull length to width ratio is wrong. Is this perhaps a sand bagger?

The mast gets stepped way up front, if you look closely you'll see a red mooring ball stuck in the deck next to the bow.

Yeah, you'd think it was all portioned wrong but you'd be the one wrong on that one; cat boats were often stepped "way" up front. I'll do some research later on Gill's boats. There's one that sails with my friends Beetle cats on the pond every year, it's a cat boat too, similar to Senad, mast way up front.

It's a strange beast Cat boats, they don't point to well but are forgiving and easy to sail, a gentleman's rig B)

The reason I questioned it is because a traditional cat boat is roughly L by W(1/2 L) or the width is half the length. That quality is what makes the cat boat so stable and able to handle weather that scares the livin bejeezus out of most other craft.

Another big advantage of the cat-rig is that a single sailor can manage the boat in just about any weather thumbs up

If I ever build a cruising boat, or even a picnic sailor; it will be a cat for sure B)

It is an easy sail plan to handle and the boats are stable for sure. Most all these boats came from working class back grounds as I'm sure you know (can you say payload), and usually worked by one man. The owner. I just like them cause they're so darn pretty, but I was always an easy mark for a pretty face B)
July 18, 2010 08:37PM
I have plans for several different sizes ranging from 15' on up to 28'.

If I get the chance, I'm going to build one of the 15 footers. It will have a small cuddy for a head and overnight camping in inclement weather. And it will be trailerable thumbs up
rkj
July 19, 2010 09:42PM
Quote
Archeo-peteriX
I have plans for several different sizes ranging from 15' on up to 28'.

If I get the chance, I'm going to build one of the 15 footers. It will have a small cuddy for a head and overnight camping in inclement weather. And it will be trailerable thumbs up

That sounds like the perfect boat Peter, I'm looking forward to the trailerable thing.
July 22, 2010 06:34PM
You sure know stuff about boats...
There is a Marina 10 minutes walking from where i am, but most boats there are boring fiberglass newish models.

[www.manorhouses.com]
July 22, 2010 08:20PM
Quote
Jose Pinto
You sure know stuff about boats...
There is a Marina 10 minutes walking from where i am, but most boats there are boring fiberglass newish models.

[www.manorhouses.com]

Sadly, the industry sold fiberglass as the magic panacea, and the world bought into it sad smiley

Fiberglass boats are appliances, just like stoves, refrigerators and toaster ovens. The fact is that no fiberglass boat has ever outlasted a wooden boat.

Why is that...because a wooden boat can be restored with new wood pieces while a fiberglass boat simply continues to disintegrate from age, the sun and basic chemical atrophy.

If you don't want maintenance and can replace your boat every twenty five to thirty years than maybe fiberglass is the answer...if you love your boat and want to hand it down to your kids or a deserving friend; then wood is the answer; it can always be restored!

On top of that, any sailor will tell you that no plastic boat ever sailed the same as a nice wooden boat; wood is warm in spirit while plastic is cold at all times sad smiley
rkj
July 22, 2010 09:33PM
Sadly, the industry sold fiberglass as the magic panacea, and the world bought into it sad smiley

Progress, most people buy into it.... eye rolling smiley


Fiberglass boats are appliances, just like stoves, refrigerators and toaster ovens. The fact is that no fiberglass boat has ever outlasted a wooden boat.

Couldn't agree more but Tupperware boats have put a lot of people on the water, which is a good thing; my last two boats were glass and I couldn't imagine more work! eye rolling smiley

Why is that...because a wooden boat can be restored with new wood pieces while a fiberglass boat simply continues to disintegrate from age, the sun and basic chemical atrophy.

True enough, but there are good and bad glass boats, some last a long time thumbs up

If you don't want maintenance and can replace your boat every twenty five to thirty years than maybe fiberglass is the answer...if you love your boat and want to hand it down to your kids or a deserving friend; then wood is the answer; it can always be restored!

On top of that, any sailor will tell you that no plastic boat ever sailed the same as a nice wooden boat; wood is warm in spirit while plastic is cold at all times sad smiley

That goes for power boats too, wood is organic and it feels like it when it goes through water, really thumbs up

You're such a purest Peter, I love it smileys with beer
July 22, 2010 11:18PM
I've built enough wooden boats to know that each and every one of them has soul(a little bit of the builder) in them. I just don't get that feeling from fiberglass or metal; although a ferro-cement hull must have a bit of soul since the molds that are needed to pour these hulls are built from wood by builders that put a little of themselves into them.

Don't get me wrong; fiberglass has it's place but if given a choice, I will take wood any time smileys with beer
rkj
July 23, 2010 12:43AM
Quote
Archeo-peteriX
I've built enough wooden boats to know that each and every one of them has soul(a little bit of the builder) in them. I just don't get that feeling from fiberglass or metal; although a ferro-cement hull must have a bit of soul since the molds that are needed to pour these hulls are built from wood by builders that put a little of themselves into them.

Don't get me wrong; fiberglass has it's place but if given a choice, I will take wood any time smileys with beer

Me too, now that I'm retired and have way too much time on my hands eye rolling smiley but the Blue Jay I just got is glass, built in the good time period though smileys with beer

I'm still working on the trailer but next week, maybe, Janet and I will have our maiden voyage thumbs up we're both looking forward to it. There will be pictures B)
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