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fitting lightly used tyres

Posted by nomis3613 
December 10, 2011 08:38PM
Hi,
I bought a set of wheels and they came with tyres in good condition. The tyres are not directional, but I'm wondering with tyre rotation stuff whether there's anything I need to look for when deciding which wheel goes where?

Or does it not matter so I should just chuck 'em on randomly?

Thanks,
Simon
December 10, 2011 09:01PM
Put them on in any fashion you like; they will soon adjust to their new homes.
If they were uni-directional then you would have to make sure they were all 'pointing' forward smiling smiley
December 10, 2011 10:29PM
Many years ago radial tires were sensitive to being reversed on rotation but that seems to have been cured. I usually mark my tires when I take them off for seasonal changes just so I do not forget where they need to go next to get even wear. On my E-30, I move them from front to back about 5000 mile intervals. That way they wear evenly on the edges.

Bob in Everett
December 11, 2011 04:20PM
Thanks guys. Since I don't know which corner of the car they came off, guess I'll go with Peter's method!
December 12, 2011 11:49AM
Quote
nomis3613
Thanks guys. Since I don't know which corner of the car they came off, guess I'll go with Peter's method!

If tyres are not directional, You should be OK.
Just make sure to put the best couple tires in the rear axle, the worse at front.
rkj
December 14, 2011 11:17AM
Quote
Jose Pinto
Quote
nomis3613
Thanks guys. Since I don't know which corner of the car they came off, guess I'll go with Peter's method!

If tyres are not directional, You should be OK.
Just make sure to put the best couple tires in the rear axle, the worse at front.

I'm wondering why the best go to the rear, usually I use the best in the front so the car goes straight and save the marginal ones for the rear; I burn those off in no time!

Cheers, Rick
December 14, 2011 12:21PM
There is a good movie on you tube:




(they are speaking Portuguese with Brazilian accent)
It is simple: one car, one track, two pairs of tires.
When the pilot drives the track with good tires in the rear axle and worse ones in front, no problem.
With good tires in the front and bad in the rear, the car oversteer and spins out of control.
It's good for a FWD Ford or RWD BMW, or any car.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 12/14/2011 12:22PM by Jose Pinto.
December 14, 2011 03:05PM
Thanks for the video, Jose.

I thought the worse tyres went on the front, because- with a bit of silly driving- the rears will soon catch up! tongue sticking out smiley
rkj
December 14, 2011 10:40PM
Quote
Jose Pinto
There is a good movie on you tube:




(they are speaking Portuguese with Brazilian accent)
It is simple: one car, one track, two pairs of tires.
When the pilot drives the track with good tires in the rear axle and worse ones in front, no problem.
With good tires in the front and bad in the rear, the car oversteer and spins out of control.
It's good for a FWD Ford or RWD BMW, or any car.

Okay, that makes sense.
December 15, 2011 07:55AM
Quote
Jose Pinto
There is a good movie on you tube:




(they are speaking Portuguese with Brazilian accent)
It is simple: one car, one track, two pairs of tires.
When the pilot drives the track with good tires in the rear axle and worse ones in front, no problem.
With good tires in the front and bad in the rear, the car oversteer and spins out of control.
It's good for a FWD Ford or RWD BMW, or any car.
I couldn't understand a word they were speaking, but I could tell what they were saying. smiling smiley

It's for that very reason that most tire shops in the U.S. will ALWAYS put the least grippy tires on the front. If you ask them to do it the other way, most will refuse.

__________
Dave
'91 325iX
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