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New tires needed ASAP - Pls Advise

Posted by Kelly 
February 27, 2010 10:33AM
Hi,

Yesterday I learned that I need new tires. One of my tires had a 6" crack on the inner side wall which caused a flat. the right rear tire has a tiny bulge on the side wall. The tire shop said the car is safe to drive for the present.


Which tires should I buy for a "normal" city street driving Beemie with 15" BBS Basketweave rims?

The lower friction gas saving tires sound interesting to me - unless that means less breaking ability on damp downhill stretches.

Also, I'd like to avoid tires made in China. I have little faith in quality standards.

Thanks, Kelly
February 27, 2010 02:50PM
I bought a set of Falken ZE-912 tires a few months ago.

[www.falkentire.com]

We've had an unusually wet and cold winter here in Tennessee and I've been very happy with the way these tires performed in the rain and snow. They weren't all that expensive either.

John
rkj
February 27, 2010 04:49PM
Quote
Kelly
Hi,

Yesterday I learned that I need new tires. One of my tires had a 6" crack on the inner side wall which caused a flat. the right rear tire has a tiny bulge on the side wall. The tire shop said the car is safe to drive for the present.


Which tires should I buy for a "normal" city street driving Beemie with 15" BBS Basketweave rims?

The lower friction gas saving tires sound interesting to me - unless that means less breaking ability on damp downhill stretches.

Also, I'd like to avoid tires made in China. I have little faith in quality standards.

Thanks, Kelly

I'm a Michelin man (not as fat tho), see what they have in your size Kelly; you'll pay, but worth it, I love em, stick great (even on ice) and wear forever, cheap actually smiling smiley see, no matter what you buy(do your homework, tire salesmen will sell you anything), if you can get an open tread design that has a good sticky compound so the car will do what you tell it to!

Tires and oil, two things I don't cheap out on, Rick

Rick
February 27, 2010 08:59PM
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rkj
...

Tires and oil, two things I don't cheap out on, Rick

Rick

Right there with you Rick...tires are the only important thing between your backside and the assphault winking smiley

Cheap out on other stuff but put the best quality tires you can afford on the car!
February 28, 2010 06:37AM
That means buying tyres of which the size doesn't start with 'P'. I used to have a set of Kumho Ecsta's on my iS, was pretty happy with them, they last long with pretty good allround capabilities. I had to change the rear ones, Marangoni don't-know-whats, as I'll be buying another car soon and wear my rear ones on the iS a lot faster.

On my iX I used to have Michelin Exalto's, not cheap, real good but I let the iX eat them for breakfast.
February 28, 2010 10:45PM
I vote for the Michelin too. I have had no trouble with any of them over the past many years.

Bob in Everett
Tires and oil, two things I don't cheap out on, Rick

Rick[/quote]

Right there with you Rick...tires are the only important thing between your backside and the assphault winking smiley

Cheap out on other stuff but put the best quality tires you can afford on the car![/quote]

Hi All,

Sounds like Michelins are a great choice. I looked at their web site. I'm like a stranger in a foreign land. I don't know how to filter our the marketing hype from the actual description of the tires. According to Michelin's web site I will need size 195/65HR15. (Although the tire shop gave me a different size 20560R14 for a Sumitomo which I did not choose.) Based on this 4 different options appealed to me.

Primacy MXV4 - Performance Touring
60,000-Mile Warranty - Primacy™ MXV4® tires feature Advanced MaxTouch Construction™, a unique contact patch shape and design that allows for long-lasting, even treadwear. Quiet, Comfortable Ride - Michelin Comfort Control Technology™ uses computer-optimized design and precision manufacturing to offer greatly reduced vibrations and road noise. Confident Wet-Weather Handling - 2-D Active Sipes alternately lock together and open as needed to provide increased biting edges that grip the road for improved all-season handling, especially in rain and snow.

Pilot Exacto
45,000-Mile Limited Warranty - A Life Maximized Adherence™ all-season tread compound helps deliver extreme all-season grip that is able to maintain heightened performance season after season, year after year. Precise Control in Wet Conditions - Deep, precisely cut HydroChutes™ help channel water away quickly, offering great wet-weather confidence. Feel Every Curve - A European handling profile, featuring a rounder shoulder, is designed to provide progressive, predictable cornering, letting you fully enjoy all of your vehicle's performance capabilities.


I tend to think that the Primacy looks good - 60,000 miles and a quiet ride. My car is a convertible - there is plenty of noise. Although the Exacto's "feel every curve" sounds appealing, the San Francisco roads are pot holed and cracked.

Given everyone's advice, I would like to buy nice, long lasting tires. The 2 options above are what Michelin's web site recommended rather than price. Basically, at the moment I'm driving on "borrowed time." I want new tires on the car as quickly as possible. I will buy then through a tire shop - not the Internet.

Do you think that the Primacy would be a good choice? Or is there another Michelin model that I should consider.

Pls let me know.



10,000 Thanks, Kelly
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Kelly
According to Michelin's web site I will need size 195/65HR15.
This is wrong. Those tires would be too big.

The stock 14" tire size is 195/65-14. The equivalent 15" tire size (and stock on the iX) is 205/55-15. If you wanted a skinnier tire, you could go to 195/60-15, which would still be a little too big, but would be closer.

205/55-15 is not a common tire size, but there are a few good options. The best way to window shop is to visit the Tire Rack and search by tire size. Tire Rack doesn't carry every single kind of tire made, but they carry almost all of them. So even if you prefer to buy from your local tire shop (as I do), the Tire Rack is still a great place to educate yourself ahead of time.

The Michelin Pilot Exalto A/S is available in that size and is very highly rated. It would probably be a good choice for you. I have the Yokohama S.drive, and I love them, but they are a lower-treadwear higher-performance summer tire, which it sounds like you don't want. Another option might be the Yokohama AVID V4S, which is an all-season tire like the Michelin and has a very high treadwear rating.

You can compare the relative sizes of different tire sizes at this tire size calculator. It's a handy tool that I refer to often.

__________
Dave
'91 325iX
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Dave_G
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Kelly
According to Michelin's web site I will need size 195/65HR15.
This is wrong. Those tires would be too big.

The stock 14" tire size is 195/65-14. The equivalent 15" tire size (and stock on the iX) is 205/55-15. If you wanted a skinnier tire, you could go to 195/60-15, which would still be a little too big, but would be closer.

205/55-15 is not a common tire size, but there are a few good options. The best way to window shop is to visit the Tire Rack and search by tire size. Tire Rack doesn't carry every single kind of tire made, but they carry almost all of them. So even if you prefer to buy from your local tire shop (as I do), the Tire Rack is still a great place to educate yourself ahead of time.

The Michelin Pilot Exalto A/S is available in that size and is very highly rated. It would probably be a good choice for you. I have the Yokohama S.drive, and I love them, but they are a lower-treadwear higher-performance summer tire, which it sounds like you don't want. Another option might be the Yokohama AVID V4S, which is an all-season tire like the Michelin and has a very high treadwear rating.

You can compare the relative sizes of different tire sizes at this tire size calculator. It's a handy tool that I refer to often.

Hi All,

As I said - a stranger in a new land. Turns out my basketwave rims are 14" not 15". (I used a measuring tape across the rim rather than reading the code on the tire.) Sorry about that. The Michelin tire that fits is the 195/65-14 called "The Harmony"
The Harmony

This is a narrow tire (195) compared to the 205 "Road Runners" now on the car. (The Road Runners were on the car when I bought it. The "spare" in the trunk was a 195 Pirelli. Now it is on the front opposite a 205 Road Runner. Beemie is asymmetric. Probably not good.)

How is the driving (cornering, breaking) changed buy switching from a 205 to 195?

Acceleration is not my main concern. Cornering* and breaking are critical. I would think the wider 205 (more rubber on the pavement) is better?

(* Uhh my mind wonders back to the ultra terrifying right turn I once made to avoid hitting a car that I thought was pulling out in front of me. Little Beemie was a champ and remained smooth and level.)

Looking forward to your answers as usual, Kelly smiling smiley
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Kelly
How is the driving (cornering, breaking) changed buy switching from a 205 to 195?

I'm also interested on people's opinion on this. Intuition tells me that a wider tire would get worse gas milage, but would brake better. I would also expect it to effect steering, and not in a positive direction.

However, what physics tells us should happen, and what is actually perceivable, are often two different things smiling smiley

I'd fall back on the "BMW Engineers know best", but those decisions may have been made with different priorities in mind, available technology, or economics. What do you guys think?

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1989 - E30 - M20 - Manual. Approximately 270,000 miles
2000 - E46 - M52TUB28 - Manual. Approximately 110,000 miles

rkj
I just put four Harmony's on Janet's car, replacing the four that came off 195x65x14

Great tire, it replaced the MX4 which was a little loud but worked great. Tire Rack thumbs up

Good luck Kelly, and don't feel bad; most of us have to learn at tire time too, you're lucky, you've got us B)-

I went for 205x60x14 on my car but it does put the pan closer to the road eye rolling smiley but it looks cool!

Rick
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rkj

I went for 205x60x14 on my car but it does put the pan closer to the road eye rolling smiley but it looks cool!

Rick

Were those the Yokohama AVS ES100 model or the Sumimoto HR200?

But both of these are summer tires. Do they brake well in the rain?

smiling smiley Kelly



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 03/01/2010 10:48PM by Kelly.
rkj
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Kelly
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rkj

I went for 205x60x14 on my car but it does put the pan closer to the road eye rolling smiley but it looks cool!

Rick

Were those the Yokohama AVS ES100 model or the Sumimoto HR200?

But both of these are summer tires. Do they brake well in the rain?

smiling smiley Kelly
Sumitomos, but I think they're... hold on I'll look what model they are smileys with beer HTR H4 is what they are.

When I first put them on they felt great on the dry and the wet,but a few weeks later I had to use the car in the ice and frozen snow, they scared the crap out of me and I limped the few blocks back home- two years later (just a few weeks ago) I was out in normal snow and they were fine. I wanted to try that size (205x60x14) and do like the stiffer sidewall action, it goes perfectly with the IS springs and shocks (I'm in to the stock set-up) that, to me, is the perfect street set-up; supple but able to handle a higher speed turn. All tires need a break in period, about 100 miles I think.

I've tried Yokohama's a few times but have chosen the wrong models, I know they make decent tires, I just haven't had the right ones, and I'm fairly good at making tire choices. That's why it pays to read reviews if nothing else smiling smiley

Rick
Actually the proper size to substitute for the 195-65-14 is 215-60-14. I have used that size for over 15 yrs on my 88is and did not see any fuel mileage difference. Depending on the make, however, you will find that aquaplanning is definitely worse with the wider tires, especially on 'slushy' pavement.

If you are going with 205-60 size, then yes the car will be slightly lowered rue to the slightly smaller radius.

I have found the Goodrich T/A to be satisfactory., but tires in this size are rare so one can't be too picky.

Salut, Bob P.
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Bob P 325is 88
tires in this size are rare so one can't be too picky.

Salut, Bob P.

Sing it Bros!

Wow, it has been hard to decide. I even emailed Ove with the 3 choices: Yokohama 205/60/14, Sumitomo 205/60/14, and Michelin 195/65/14. His first e-mail suggested that the Michelins might be the most comfy. Then added

"I am not familiar with the Michelins, but I have heard good reviews about the Yokohamas. I have had a set of the Sumitomos myself. Compared to most tire models over here, they had a very hard rubber compound. They could take a lot of the heat on track days, but the grip in the wet was rather poor. They were very predictable on the limit, though. I also got a lot of miles out of them.

Ove."

I called the Tire Rack guys who thought the Yokohama would be too hard and the Sumitomo's a little softer.

For a brief while, I thought about buying both the Yokohamas (and storing in the basement) and the Michelins. Fortunately, that delusion soon passed when I realized that I need 4 extra tires about the same as I need a hole in the head. They would become "decorative tires" or perhaps a super attractive coffee table base.

I decided that I've done enough hand wringing. I ordered the Michelins at my local tire shop. On Sat, Beemie will have new shoes.

Thanks for all your input, Kelly :-)
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Dave_G
205/55-15 is not a common tire size, but there are a few good options... I have the Yokohama S.drive, and I love them, but they are a lower-treadwear higher-performance summer tire...
In anticipation of an early spring I just bought a set of those Yokohama S.drive tires in 205/55R15 from Tirerack.com. I haven't had them mounted yet though as there's still a good chance we'll get another dump of snow sometime this month.

Okay, so what I want to know is how come if I go to a Canadian website selling tires like [www.1010tires.com], these tires in size 205/55R15 list for cdn$165.99 each? Currently that converts to us$162.72 each.

But on the US website [www.tirerack.com], the exact same tire sells for only us$84.00?!?

What's up with that?

Needless to say I ordered the tires from Tirerack, had them shipped to the nearest UPS store on the American side, then took a long lunch break to drive the 45 minutes each way down from Ottawa across the border to pick them up, and saved myself over $300 in the process.
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Ferdinand
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Dave_G
205/55-15 is not a common tire size, but there are a few good options... I have the Yokohama S.drive, and I love them, but they are a lower-treadwear higher-performance summer tire...
In anticipation of an early spring I just bought a set of those Yokohama S.drive tires in 205/55R15 from Tirerack.com. I haven't had them mounted yet though as there's still a good chance we'll get another dump of snow sometime this month.

Okay, so what I want to know is how come if I go to a Canadian website selling tires like [www.1010tires.com], these tires in size 205/55R15 list for cdn$165.99 each? Currently that converts to us$162.72 each.

But on the US website [www.tirerack.com], the exact same tire sells for only us$84.00?!?

What's up with that?

Needless to say I ordered the tires from Tirerack, had them shipped to the nearest UPS store on the American side, then took a long lunch break to drive the 45 minutes each way down from Ottawa across the border to pick them up, and saved myself over $300 in the process.

Outside of the obvious reasons to change the price, like economics, public mindset (willingness to pay), and difficulty of the sale, there is the often forgotten one. Tax. I don't know how much it would apply in this circumstance, but growing up on the border of two US states that handle taxes very differently (One has an income tax, the other has a sales tax) there are vast differences in prices due to it. On top of blanket taxes, there are individual taxes on specific items. It wouldn't surprise me if there was a special tax on tires, with the idea that for every tire you buy, "The State" has to repair a certain amount of road damage. I know governments often handle this with a Gas tax, which is why a 2 mile jump across the river from my house lands me paying 20 cents less for gas B)
I don't think there is a reason it couldn't work with Tires as well though.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1989 - E30 - M20 - Manual. Approximately 270,000 miles
2000 - E46 - M52TUB28 - Manual. Approximately 110,000 miles

That said, a 100% increase in price is outrageous!

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1989 - E30 - M20 - Manual. Approximately 270,000 miles
2000 - E46 - M52TUB28 - Manual. Approximately 110,000 miles

Quote
Earendil
That said, a 100% increase in price is outrageous!
Outrageous for sure.

I have to pay the sales tax regardless either way. If I buy the tires locally I pay the tax during the purchase. But if I bring the tires across myself from the US, I have to declare them at the border when crossing back into Canada and then I pay the same tax there.

The only possible differences are import tariffs and duty. But if the product is made in the USA, which these Yokohama tires are, there is no extra duty or tariff imposed.

Then there is the transportation cost. If I order the tires and have them shipped from the USA to my doorstep in Canada, I have to deal with those UPS pirates who charge an arm and a leg for "brokerage fees" when bringing stuff across the border, and they always try to deliver when I'm not at home, then three days later make me drive across town during working hours to line up and wait at their depot to pick the package up myself. I absolutely despise UPS.

Instead I paid the reasonable $50 shipping fee to have Tirerack send the tires to the UPS store in Ogdensburg, NY. Tirerack sends me a tracking number so I can follow the progress of the shipment. When I know the tires have arrived in Ogdensburg, I take a long lunch break from work and do the 1.5 hour round trip down to nip across the border to pick up my package.

Other than maybe $20 in gas, plus another $3 bridge toll each way to cross the river, I still save over $300. How is that possible?
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Ferdinand
I have to pay the sales tax regardless either way. If I buy the tires locally I pay the tax during the purchase. But if I bring the tires across myself from the US, I have to declare them at the border when crossing back into Canada and then I pay the same tax there.
Actually, I saved a chunk of money this way too. It's NOT the same amount of tax.

If I buy the tires locally I'd have to pay double the amount of tax since the tax is calculated as a percentage of the $166/ea cost of the tires here, versus the $84/ea I paid in the USA.
No use in buying two sets either, tyres wear when not being used as well.
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Michiel 318iS
No use in buying two sets either, tyres wear when not being used as well.

You know, you should really stop storing those tires on your treadmill... tongue sticking out smiley

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1989 - E30 - M20 - Manual. Approximately 270,000 miles
2000 - E46 - M52TUB28 - Manual. Approximately 110,000 miles

Quote
Ferdinand


Other than maybe $20 in gas, plus another $3 bridge toll each way to cross the river, I still save over $300. How is that possible?

Hi All,

My best answer to your question Ferd is that you are thinking! And economy of scale is working in your favor.

All right kids - it's time for a mini-vent. My beloved Beemie is still toodling around on the old tires of doom. Why? Back ordered. ugg.

Two weeks ago I called "Ye Olde Tire Shoppe" which happened to be a Michelin dealer. "Hello, I'd like tires. 4 Michelin Harmony 195.65.14 please. They'll arrive in you shop on Fri? Great. I'll drive over on Sat for the installation. Thanks." When I finished the conversation, I was under the impression that they would order tires. I called on Sat, "Hi are my Harmonies around? (On hold for 5 min.) Umm, sorry, What? You did not order them? Well OK. So when can you get them? On Tues? Ok, great. I"ll call to check before driving over. Thanks." The following Sat I call again "Hi, how are those Harmonies?" Now the shop owner chimes in - "Umm ma'am, I'll sorry. I think we are having a communication problem here. Perhaps my staff did not communicate to you that these tires are back ordered. I can have them express delivered, but that will be $100 more which seems a little crazy." I reply "Umm. Ok well, realistically when can you get them?" He said "Two weeks I'm pretty sure." I said, "Well, ok. I can wait 2 weeks more - sure. But if it extends to 2 months - that is not so good. I feel like I'm driving around on borrowed time. I mean you saw my worrisome tire condition yourself. Good thing I have a new AAA membership." He responded, "Umm, yes. I understand. I'm sorry about this. I will call you on Fri and give you a status report."

So this is the state of things: (1) Driver, (1) Car, and (4) timebombs.

At least the tires held together during yet another emergency stop at the dreaded T-intersection which I pass daily. (You may remember a posting from maybe 1.5 years ago about another incident at this intersection. I even drew a graphic.) My road is the "straight through" road and does not have a stop sign. Behind me there is a new black 525, and behind him a red motorcycle. The other road dead ends into "my" road on my right side. A small red truck pulls perpendicularly into the road in front of me from the dead end road - turning left in front of me. Happily the red truck driver has judged the distance between his car and mine quite well. I'm not worried at this point, but I remove my foot from the accelerator and cover the brake. No biggie. Next, a green car ignores their stop sign and follows the red truck into the road. There is about 5 ft between the green car's and the red truck's bumpers. I apply moderate pressure to the brake pedal and place my right hand gently on the horn in preparation. I glance into the rear view mirror to estimate the distance between the black 525 and me - about 35 ft at this point. Yep, you guessed it...behind the green car there is a silver Jetta. The Jetta driver also ignores the stop sign and follows the green car into the road. Again, there is about 5 ft between the green car and the silver Jetta's bumper. When I first see the Jetta entering the road, I apply MAXIMUM pressure to both the brake pedal and the horn. I can only hope that the 525 driver is alert. A quick glance in my rear view mirrors reveals that his front end has lowered down from his braking deceleration. The motorcyclist (originally behind the 525) brakes, swerves left, and is now driving directly over the double yellow center line and to the left of the 525 which I am sure gave the red truck driver a heart attack when he saw the cyclist swerving on to the yellow center line along. Because Beemie is perfect, it rapidly stopped allowing a comfortable 10 ft between the front bumper the silver Jetta's side. The 525 stopped about 10ft behind Beemie. And the cyclist stopped along side the 525 perhaps with the help of a few Hail Marys. The red truck diver probably needed to wring out his mental under pants as well. This entire sequence occurred within maybe 10 seconds or a few more. No one was hurt, and no cars scratched.

Ah well, that's enough for tonight. I hope you are well,

Kelly
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Kelly

At least the old tires held together during yet another emergency stop at the dreaded T-intersection which I pass daily.

Hi All,

I hope that you are well. Well Beemie has new Michelin Harmonies finally! Phew.

Keeping in mind that my car is a convertible, I can say that the road noise has reduced by 80%. No more banging noises. Perhaps the old RoadRunner tires were quite hard - I do not know. I have noticed quite a bit more "body lean" when turning sharply. Here is my question - will softer tires allow my car to roll over more easily? (Not that I usually drive aggressively.But if I had to perform another emergency "higher speed turn" in a convertible...) Or would the tires "unseat" themselves from the rims? I know this question has many vagueries.

Let me know if you have thoughts.

Cheers, Kelly
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Kelly
will softer tires allow my car to roll over more easily? (Not that I usually drive aggressively.But if I had to perform another emergency "higher speed turn" in a convertible...) Or would the tires "unseat" themselves from the rims?
No. I've flogged a lot of cars as hard as they'll go in autocrosses and race tracks, in ways that cars on the street rarely see. I'm constantly driving on squealing tires (like the old racer's adage says, a squealing tire is a happy tire smiling smiley). It's nearly impossible to roll a car unless you go off the pavement (if you go off in the soft dirt or the ditch, all bets are off). Unlike the videos we've seen of SUVs flipping over in emergency maneuvers, it just doesn't happen with cars. When they reach the limit, they just slide. Tires with softer sidewalls will be less responsive (and usually more comfortable), but they won't make your car roll.

It's also pretty much impossible for tires to unseat themselves from the rim if they're properly inflated. I ran my iX once in an autocross, using race tires from my Miata (they use the same wheel size). Those sticky tires have a lot of grip, putting a lot of pressure on the sidewalls. I thought I had them inflated high enough, but people told me after one of my runs that the sidewalls had completely rolled over, and the edge of the rim was practically on the pavement! (I could actually feel it inside the car when that happened.) But they never rolled off the rim. It's hard enough to get the bead off the rim when you're trying to -- I've never heard of it happening while driving.

Enjoy your new tires!

__________
Dave
'91 325iX
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Dave_G
No...
+1

the initial softness you are feeling ("sidewall compliance" is the jargon) only affects the initial travel. You don't have to worry about it causing a rollover or the tyre falling off the rim. Maybe the old ones were really hard, or over-inflated.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 04/05/2010 09:11PM by nomis3613.
rkj
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Kelly
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Kelly

At least the old tires held together during yet another emergency stop at the dreaded T-intersection which I pass daily.

Hi All,

I hope that you are well. Well Beemie has new Michelin Harmonies finally! Phew.

Keeping in mind that my car is a convertible, I can say that the road noise has reduced by 80%. No more banging noises. Perhaps the old RoadRunner tires were quite hard - I do not know. I have noticed quite a bit more "body lean" when turning sharply. Here is my question - will softer tires allow my car to roll over more easily? (Not that I usually drive aggressively.But if I had to perform another emergency "higher speed turn" in a convertible...) Or would the tires "unseat" themselves from the rims? I know this question has many vagueries.

Let me know if you have thoughts.

Cheers, Kelly

I agree with everything Dave sez, in addition, you might have had 60s series tires before giving your car a little less roll action (I think you went with oem 195x65, yes?). If the larger sidewalls give you a unsafe feeling you might want a stiffer shock but if you're just street driving (like Janet's car is/does) you might come to like the cushier feeling the taller sidewalls give.

My car (1988 325is) has the stiffer suspension (stock, that's what I like) with the 205x60 tires which I also love but sometimes it's nice to get in a automatic cushy car that just goes.... and goes effortlessly B) thumbs up goes......and goes thumbs up smileys with beer thumbs up

What pressure are you running?

Good Luck with the new skins Kelly
September 30, 2010 02:01PM
Kelly,

I have the same question you had back in February about new tires. I have a 1987 325ic, live in North Carolina, and am looking for a 3-season tire for normal street use. It currrently has the 195/60 R14 Michelin Roadhandler Sport tires that were on it when I bought it 12 years ago. I am running stock bottlecaps, and looking for a quiet ride with good rain performance. How are the Michelin Harmonies working out for you?

Andy

Andy
1987 325ic
rkj
October 01, 2010 06:37PM
Quote
akstraw
Kelly,

I have the same question you had back in February about new tires. I have a 1987 325ic, live in North Carolina, and am looking for a 3-season tire for normal street use. It currrently has the 195/60 R14 Michelin Roadhandler Sport tires that were on it when I bought it 12 years ago. I am running stock bottlecaps, and looking for a quiet ride with good rain performance. How are the Michelin Harmonies working out for you?

Andy

Hey Andy, I'm running the Harmonies on my wife's car(1987 325e bottlecaps)195x65x14) and this is our second set, I like them but they are a tall tire (read squishy). On my car, 1988 325is, I'm running sumitomos 205x60x14 on baskweaves and they are a little nicer when you pitch the car in to a turn, especially if you overcook one! but it does put the car a touch lower to the ground (oil pan blues)

My suggestion is to look in tire rack's selection for tire size, our choices are getting slim these days. Soon we'll have to go to those great wheels Cab runs on his car; 15 inch Basketweaves from Ronel? my spelling might be off eye rolling smiley Ronal?

Rick
October 02, 2010 03:31AM
Ronal it is. How much is your speedo and odo off by having smaller tyres?
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