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Restoring my bicycle, need some rear hub advice.

Posted by rkj 
rkj
I've got a great old mountain bike and have always wanted to have a matching rear wheel for my front original. I have a question about the difference in cassette hubs and freewheeling ones. I see a bunch of neat rear rims today (that would match my front wheel) but they're all cassette hub wheels. If I wanted to go through all the trouble of switching over to cassette would the wheel hub fit in the frame and would I need all new shifting gear; derailleurs, levers etc.

Is there an advantage to the later model set-up anyway?

Thanks, Rick
I don't know the differences between the various hubs but if you wanted to keep the one you have now and change the rim to match or the other way around; it's not really that big a deal to respoke a hub/rim.

I did dozens of these in my youth at motorcycle shops and an old time bicycle shop.
Peterr, I have trued wheels before, no biggie but how do you start from scratch and keep the hub concentric to the wheel? Is it just trial and error?

alan



Spoking a wheel

With some Sunday morning humor
rkj
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Michiel 318iS



Spoking a wheel

With some Sunday morning humor

I've never done this (I'm such a rookie) cause it's so much work (great video though). Even when I bought special rims for the race bike(motorcycle) I had them laced for me!

I might have found a solution to my problem here though; I have a parts bike with beautiful wheels and (I think) the same kind of rear sprocket set-up (freewheeling style). That's actually a good thing because I'm pretty sure the cassette style hubs are spaced differently and would not fit in my frame...

I use my bike (Janet loves to ride too) for usual stuff but nowadays I need it for working out; it's part of my rehab program.

Cheers, Rick
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alanrw
Peterr, I have trued wheels before, no biggie but how do you start from scratch and keep the hub concentric to the wheel? Is it just trial and error?

alan

:mmbeer:Beer helps but I learned early that a truing jig was a big time saver.

I made a wooden block that allowed me to quickly see what progress I was making.

Basically, I would hand torque the spoke screws until the wheel was roughly round and the run out was within an inch or less.
After that; with the block; it was pretty simple to dial the rim in. Usually, I could get a wheel true in about 10 minutes(not including threading the spokes through the hub and into the rim).
rkj
Hey Peter, do you still ride a bicycle?
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rkj
Hey Peter, do you still ride a bicycle?

Not for a long time.
I do take them out once a year, clean them up, put air in the tires and take a short spin; but that's about it sad smiley
Emergency transportation...
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Michiel 318iS
Emergency transportation...

Yes...just like the canoes hanging from garage ceiling; they're ready in case we get a flood. It would take a biblical flood though since I'm about 80 feet above sea level on a bluff winking smiley
rkj
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Archeo-peteriX
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rkj
Hey Peter, do you still ride a bicycle?

Not for a long time.
I do take them out once a year, clean them up, put air in the tires and take a short spin; but that's about it sad smiley

You might want to reconsider Peter; riding my bike makes me feel like a kid again smileys with beer I think it's something about the simplicity of it.
Agreed Rick, wind in hair, gears clicking along, zooming down hills, the only problem is that riding a bike around here is akin to air combat. Too many drivers texting while they drive. I gave up riding after having a few close calls, I do miss it.

alan
Same here with narrow streets and no bike lanes, do not ride at all. I pass a couple of hardy souls on my way to work some days but cringe for them when I see other cars giving them no room.

Bob in Everett
rkj
I know what you mean Alan & Bob, out here though the bikes are taking over, in the summer anyway thumbs up I get a kick out of all the cars in their usual hurry to get nowhere... Luckily I have some great back roads to ride on by my house, not that they're safe completely but it's still great to get out there.

In a way, cell/smart phones are creating real hassles on the road; it's getting so lately most people have these dam things to their ear while driving. I can't persuade my wife to stop doing this, in fact she reaches for the phone as soon as it rings when she's driving. Even after a stiff fine/ticket she still can't leave the phone alone.

I have a problem with this, both in the house (she answers while we're eating dinner and such) and in the car... what is that? there's answering machines on all the lines!

just venting..... Rick
Eh, just got yelled at by a friend today for not answering my cell phone when he calls. I told him I keep my cell in my glove box for weeks on end. I try not to answer it as if it rings, it usually means something at the office broke or a car registered to me won't start. I think he was dumbfounded.

:lol:

alan



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 10/23/2011 04:43PM by alanrw.
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rkj
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Archeo-peteriX
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rkj
Hey Peter, do you still ride a bicycle?

Not for a long time.
I do take them out once a year, clean them up, put air in the tires and take a short spin; but that's about it sad smiley

You might want to reconsider Peter; riding my bike makes me feel like a kid again smileys with beer I think it's something about the simplicity of it.

You are absolutely right; I should be out there getting some exercise and fresh air.
We have miles of walking/biking pathways that infrequently cross car traffic. If I was a hardy soul; I could actually ride a bicycle to work without having to hassle with cars for most of the way...but it would take me about two hours each way sad smiley

My only excuse now is that I get up in the dark and come home in the dark...no time to ride other than the week ends but the last few have been working ones anyway. Maybe next year when Spring rolls around winking smiley
rkj
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Archeo-peteriX
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rkj
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Archeo-peteriX
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rkj
Hey Peter, do you still ride a bicycle?

Not for a long time.
I do take them out once a year, clean them up, put air in the tires and take a short spin; but that's about it sad smiley

You might want to reconsider Peter; riding my bike makes me feel like a kid again smileys with beer I think it's something about the simplicity of it.

You are absolutely right; I should be out there getting some exercise and fresh air.
We have miles of walking/biking pathways that infrequently cross car traffic. If I was a hardy soul; I could actually ride a bicycle to work without having to hassle with cars for most of the way...but it would take me about two hours each way sad smiley

My only excuse now is that I get up in the dark and come home in the dark...no time to ride other than the week ends but the last few have been working ones anyway. Maybe next year when Spring rolls around winking smiley

What are you doing at work Peter, did you get a new gig?
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rkj
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Archeo-peteriX
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rkj
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Archeo-peteriX
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rkj
Hey Peter, do you still ride a bicycle?

Not for a long time.
I do take them out once a year, clean them up, put air in the tires and take a short spin; but that's about it sad smiley

You might want to reconsider Peter; riding my bike makes me feel like a kid again smileys with beer I think it's something about the simplicity of it.

You are absolutely right; I should be out there getting some exercise and fresh air.
We have miles of walking/biking pathways that infrequently cross car traffic. If I was a hardy soul; I could actually ride a bicycle to work without having to hassle with cars for most of the way...but it would take me about two hours each way sad smiley

My only excuse now is that I get up in the dark and come home in the dark...no time to ride other than the week ends but the last few have been working ones anyway. Maybe next year when Spring rolls around winking smiley

What are you doing at work Peter, did you get a new gig?

Back at the end of May, the cabinet making work dropped off...last man in, first man out :boohoo:

As it turned out; on the day I was given my notice; one of my old high tech customers contacted me for a two week gig. I started on June 1st and the work hasn't stopped!
I'm working on the next generation Smart Meters...you've probably heard about them or seen them in the news.

It looks like I'll be working into November and maybe longer :cool2:
rkj
Great Peter, that's good to hear. These smart meters are for electric usage for the house/store. right?
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rkj
Great Peter, that's good to hear. These smart meters are for electric usage for the house/store. right?

Yes; they will/are replacing the old meters that we have now. There will be no more meter maids coming around to read the little dials.
The new Smart meters are set to send all the info back to the host computer network of the utility supplying your power.

The information is send in a burst that is only a fraction of a second long. Most residential meters probably won't be set to transmit the data more than a couple of times a day, if that.

The nice thing about the meters is that they can be accessed by your wireless enabled computer and the right application. This will initially give the homeowner a heads up on what his power usage is and he can then decide to turn some things off or unplug them.

It won't be long before most new homes would be equipped with controls throughout the house so the owner can program electrical usage for optimum usage.

the power savings could be quite substantial.

The biggest savings will be for businesses and large buildings/plants.
The Smart meters will give the owner and the utility the ability to monitor and control usage.

The down side of this or any new technology is that when we save all this power; the darn utilities turn around and raise their rates because they start losing money :doh:
Great project!

Another neat function you can program is pre-paid rates, just like cell phone cards have.
For the consumer, one has control over the consumption and once the pre-paid energy is consumed, it consumes no more.
It is great for temporary rentals, tourist houses, etc, so the landlord knows he won't be stuck with the couple last bills to pay...
For the utility, they get the money before, instead of after the energy is consumed.

And I disagree the lower consumption will force the energy price up, greed is doing that and it's a lot harder to sort out.
The ability to spread the consumption over the entire day, making less on peak hours and more at slow hours, saves millions to the plants and grid management!

Hang in there, keep us posted!

:cool2:
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